Tag: perspective

'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole.  'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole.  'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole.  'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole. 
'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole. 
'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole. 
'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole. 
'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tankto fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no morethan 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where thereis a suitable - and sizeable - pothole. 

'Potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs 
depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city. 
captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban 
flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tank
to fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more. 

directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,
creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no more
than 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where there
is a suitable - and sizeable - pothole. 

(Source: designboom.com)

Is Extraterrestrial Life More a Dream Than a Real Possibility?

There is no getting around the fact that a lot of people would be very excited if extraterrestrial life existed. But while plenty of scientists are working hard to find it, others aren’t as convinced—and a team of Princeton physicists has gone as far as publishing an academic article explaining exactly why they think we’re all living in a fantasy land.

In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Edwin Turner and David Spiegel, two astrophysicists from Princeton, analyze what is known about the likelihood of life on other planets using Bayesian analysis. They weigh up how many of our existing scientific conclusions about life on other planets stem from actual, real data, and how many come from the prior assumptions of scientists.

Their analysis points out that our expectations of life cropping up on other planets tend to rest on the assumption that it is only possible on other planets under the same conditions that allowed life to flourish on Earth. Sadly, our current knowledge of other planets in the universe tends to suggest Earth is a “cosmic aberration where life took shape unusually fast”.

That suggests that we’re all being hopelessly fantastical in assuming that other life must exist. In Turner’s words, speaking to R&D Magazine:

"Fossil evidence suggests that life began very early in Earth’s history and that has led people to determine that life might be quite common in the universe because it happened so quickly here, but the knowledge about life on Earth simply doesn’t reveal much about the actual probability of life on other planets…

"Information about that probability comes largely from the assumptions scientists have going in, and some of the most optimistic conclusions have been based almost entirely on those assumptions..

"If scientists start out assuming that the chances of life existing on another planet as it does on Earth are large, then their results will be presented in a way that supports that likelihood. Our work is not a judgment, but an analysis of existing data that suggests the debate about the existence of life on other planets is framed largely by the prior assumptions of the participants."

Way to run the party, guys. Still, there is also some evidence we should remain hopeful. [PNASvia R&D Magazine]

Large quote
By nature, we do not perceive ourselves or others accurately. We magnify the importance of ourselves and diminish that of others. In the beauty of a clear night, however, we look at the stars and feel ourselves small, unimportant, and at peace. On an objective scale, we sense our insignificance. Somehow the realization comforts us. The return of the illusion hurts us, takes our peace away, allows us to magnify slights, rejections, and humiliations as others challenge the illusion of our self-importance with theirs. It is in our human nature that this be so; it is our task to transcend it.

Barry Grosskopf,  Hidden in Plain Sight 

(Source: heartbloodspirit)

Your Words Determine your Thoughts

Change your words to get a different perspective on your problem.

Words and chains of words that we use in framing a problem play a significant role in the way we approach problems. Consider the following problem: Water lilies double in area every twenty-four hours. On the first day of summer, there is one water lily on the lake. Sixty days later, the lake is completely covered with water lilies. On which day is the lake half covered?

The words “double,” “twenty-four,” “one,” “on which day,” and “sixty” coax most people to divide the sixty days by two and propose the thirtieth day as the solution, but since the lilies increase in area geometrically, this is incorrect. The lilies cover half the pond on the next-to-last day. The word structure of the problem influences us to come up with the incorrect answer.
Next, see if you can cross out six letters to make a single word out of the following (the answer is at the end):

C S R I E X L E A T T T E R E S

The important thing is not to persist with one way of looking at problems. Try to come up with different ways to look at them. When Richard Feynman, the Nobel Laureate physicist, was “stuck” with a problem, he would look at it in a different way. If one way didn’t work, he would switch to another. Whatever came up, he would always find another way to look at it.

REPHRASE THE PROBLEM IN YOUR OWN WORDS. Richard Feynman once reviewed his children’s school books. One book began with pictures of a mechanical wind-up dog, a real dog, and a motorcycle, and for each the same question: “What makes it move?” The proposed answer—“Energy makes it move”— enraged him.

That was tautology, he argued—empty definition. Feynman, having made a career of understanding the deep abstractions of energy, said it would be better to begin a science course by taking apart a toy dog, revealing the cleverness of the gears and ratchets. To tell a first-grader that “energy makes it move” would be no more helpful, he said, than saying “God makes it move” or “moveability” makes it move. He proposed teaching students how to rephrase what they learn in their own language without using definitions. For instance, without using the word energy, tell me what you know now about the dog’s motion.

Other standard explanations were just as hollow to Feynman. When someone told him that friction makes shoe leather wear out, his response was “Shoe leather wears out because it rubs against the sidewalk and the little notches and bumps on the sidewalk grab pieces and pull them off.” That is knowledge. To simply say, “It is because of friction,” is sad, because it is empty definition.

Always try to rephrase the problem in your words without using definitions. In another famous Feynman example, he was working with NASA engineers on a serious problem and they kept defining the problem as a “pressure-induced vorticity oscillatory wa-wa or something.” After considerable time and discussion had passed, a confused Feynman finally asked them if they were trying to describe a whistle? To his amazement they were. The problem they were trying to communicate to him exhibited the characteristics of a simple whistle. Once he understood what they were trying to do, he solved it instantly.

CHANGE THE WORDS. For every word a person uses, psychologists say there is a mediating response which provides the meaning of that concept for that individual. Just what the mediating responses are for all words is not known. Many times they may not be responses in the usual sense but all provide meaning of that concept for that individual. When you change the words in your problem statement, you initiate an unobservable process in your mind that may lead to a perspective.

A few years back, Toyota asked employees for ideas on how they could become more productive. They received few suggestions. They reworded the question to: “How can you make your job easier?” They were inundated with ideas. Even tiny changes can lead to unpredictable, cataclysmic results. In a sentence, one can randomly change a single letter and alter the way every other word is used.”The kids are flying planes” becomes “The lids are flying planes.”

Examine your problem statement, identify the key words, and change them five to ten times to see what results. One of the easiest words to change is the verb. Suppose you want to increase sales. Look at the changing perspectives as the verb is changed in the following:
In what ways might I increase sales?
In what ways might I attract sales?
In what ways might I develop sales?
In what ways might I extend sales?
In what ways might I repeat sales?
In what ways might I keep sales?
Magnify sales? Restore sales? Target sales? Inspire sales? Cycle sales? Encourage sales? Grow sales? Copy sales? Complement sales? Acquire sales? Vary sales? Spotlight sales? Motivate sales? Prepare sales? Renew sales? Force sales? Organize sales? And so on.

(ANSWER: Most people try to cross out six letters and fail to solve it. If, instead, you framed it “In what ways might I cross out six letters to form a common word?” you will likely find the solution which is to literally cross out the letters S, I, X, L, E, T, T, and so on, which leaves you with a single word: CREATE.)

(Source: creativitypost.com)

Love in Four Acts

In a strange way, romantic love is the least understood part of the human psyche because we are content in believing that “it just happens”, that it is something so sacred that it clearly resists rational understanding, or that it is an entirely different experience for everyone such that it is impossible to articulate. Indeed, social psychology textbooks talk a great deal about the factors that impact relationship formation (proximity, familiarity, shared attitudes etc), but they typically do not have a lot to say about romantic love as something separate from platonic friendships. But perhaps underneath the mystical, maybe even mythical, glow of love’s façade, there is something that we can articulate and talk about meaningfully. And perhaps understanding romantic love empowers us rather than corrupting love through deliberate exploration. This is a story about romantic love from four different intertwined perspectives: fairy tales, Jungian psychology, collected interviews, and biology. This is a story about what four different perspectives can tell us about romantic love.


Read More: http://www.nickyee.com/ponder/love.html


(Source: nickyee.com)

Gummy Bearskin Rug
by Brock Davis

Gummy Bearskin Rug

by Brock Davis